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Reef N Beef

 
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Vexo



Joined: 11 Apr 2005
Posts: 5244

PostPosted: Sat 01 Dec, 2007 12:58 am    Post subject: Reef N Beef Reply with quote

I'm going to the capital with parents, sister and gf for my 25th birthday next friday. We're going dinning at a place called Reef N Beef, which is supposed to be Aussie "fine cuisine".

http://www.reefnbeef.dk/

So I'm wondering... do you know if any of this is good/recommendable?

Thin slices of kangaroo loin, marinated with extra virgin olive oil, lemon pepper, chopped coriander, baby capers, shaved parmesan

Crocodile tail filet served with akudjura hollandaise blue & white potatoes.

Rolled bunya nuts pavlova with sugarbark and rosella sauce.

Maple syrup & gum leaf scented smoked salmon, wattle blinis and sea parsley dressing, lemon aspen and dill cream cheese.

Kangaroo loin served medium rare served on pan fried artichoke & sweet potatoes in extra virgin olive oil, wild Tasmanian mountain pepper sauce.

Emu filet served with warm antipasto, water buffalo mozzarella, rocket and basil pesto.

Australian certified Wagyu beef steak served with charlotte and garlic mash, shitake and enoki mushrooms, lime and chipotle chili sauce.

Baked filet of Baramundi, a typically Australian salt water fish wrapped in paperbark, garnished with exotic fruits, blue potatoes, garlic/bacon sauce.

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Golgolath



Joined: 19 Apr 2005
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PostPosted: Sat 01 Dec, 2007 2:07 am    Post subject: Re: Reef N Beef Reply with quote

sounds suspiciously like calling Taco Bell 'authentic mexican food'....

No dingo kidneys and drop bear souffle? wtf.....

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Vexo



Joined: 11 Apr 2005
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PostPosted: Sat 01 Dec, 2007 2:58 am    Post subject: Re: Reef N Beef Reply with quote

Golgolath wrote:
sounds suspiciously like calling Taco Bell 'authentic mexican food'....

No dingo kidneys and drop bear souffle? wtf.....


I wouldn't go that far :p It's the only one of its kind for one thing, and also sports quite the reputation. I've never had anything of the exotic stuff though, and I'd hate to order emu and have it taste like chicken or crocodille and have it taste like dried beef :p

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curtis



Joined: 14 Aug 2001
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PostPosted: Sat 01 Dec, 2007 8:50 am    Post subject: Re: Reef N Beef Reply with quote

Most of us have never eaten this sort of food. It has been growing in popularity, with restaurants popping up in most capital cities in Australia. I am told that most of the Native Australian meats are quite Gamey. Hence they are usually served in small thinly sliced portions with other strong tasting accompaniments.

Barramundi is (I am told, I hate seafood) to die for. Not only is it apparently a magnificent tasting fish, it also is one of the finest fishing experiences going. Minimum Bag limit is 54cm. So a large estuarine fish that won't roll over and give up. They also are well known for breaching out of the water in attempting to loose the hook.
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Miruwin



Joined: 25 Dec 2001
Posts: 2108

PostPosted: Sat 01 Dec, 2007 9:29 am    Post subject: Re: Reef N Beef Reply with quote

Australians in the main, have tended to only eat those meats and vegetables and spices which are common in northern Europe and have tended to totally ignore our own native products. Only recently have some Australians and Australian restaurants taken to investigating and making use of, a wide range of local foodstuffs. Over the last 20 or so years, Australian restaurants and to some degree, the average person, have become a lot more adventurous in the eating habits and styles.

I can tell you nothing about the restaurant you will be visiting, obviously its not known to anyone in Australia unless they have actually visited and eaten there. I looked at the website but I unfortunately do not speak Danish. The photos though, look as if it is a fairly upmarket restaurant.

I will go through some of your menu. How this stuff is cooked will depend on the abilities of the chef and his/her staff, the same as any other restaurant. The foodstuffs and the quality of the food prior to preparation is not in doubt.

All the foodstuffs listed on the menu are obviously well known and widely used by the Aboriginal population, but obviously were not cooked in the same style as is on your menu.

Kangaroo loin - the most tender and tastiest part of the kangaroo. Kangaroo meat is extremely low fat and this can cause problems with cooking styles. It is imperative that the meat is cooked quickly and not overcooked due to the low fat content it is very easy to overcook and make it tough. Nothing else in that recipe is 'Australian' and is available worldwide. Kangaroo has slowly been making its way onto the shopping lists of Australian families but it is in no way a popular meat. Probably less than 2% of Australian families would buy kangaroo.

Crocodile tail fillet - personal opinion here, crocodile is probably one of the most delicious meats I have ever eaten. Its not strongly flavoured and tends to be light and delicate. My favourite method of cooking crocodile is to do a light batter with lemon and just a tiny hint of curry then shallow frying and top with a little tamarind. Imagine combining the flavours of lobster and pork and chicken and you just about have it. The akudjura hollandaise is an interesting combination that I probably wouldn't have thought of but there is no reason it wouldn't work. The akudjura is the bush tomato which really doesn't have much of a 'tomato' flavour but does have a distinctive sort of fruity/acidic/smoky flavour. I've eaten them fresh and love them. Popularity in Australian homes for crocodile is probably less than kangaroo but is also slowly gaining in acceptance. Bush tomato is starting to pop up in a lot of more upmarket supermarket lines.

Bunya nuts - I have never eaten one but have been told that they are the most delicious of the nuts available. They can be used in a wide variety of menus and the fruit can be eaten raw, roasted, or pounded to flour to make a kind of bread. The nuts can be sliced or pureed and added to desserts and savoury dishes. The nuts' flour can also be used to make breads and cakes.

Sugarbark - I have never heard of before and I ran a check through my favourite herb and spice supplier, Herbie's at http://www.herbies.com.au/ and he doesn't appear to have a listing for it either. On further checking, there are a couple of restaurants which seem to list this as part of a menu item.

Rosella - a delicious tart and tasty 'fruit' with a raspberry and rhubarb flavour. Can be used in Chutneys and sauces or mix with some bbq sauce or salsa and serve as a spicy chutney. Lovely tasty jam for spreading on toast for breakfast.

Gum leaf - just adds a sort of woody, eucalyptus flavour which would suit the smoked salmon.

Wattle - I would assume this is wattleseeds which are slightly smoky flavoured and very tasty. Wattleseeds are also beginning to appear just about everywhere.

Sea parsley - has an intense parsley and celery flavour. Best used as a garnish or to flavour soups stews casseroles seafood and salads.

Lemon aspen - fruit has a grapefruit and lime like flavour, and is popular in beverages, sauces and confectionary. Its very tasty and I've often used it in Asian style recipes where limes or lemons are required or in any dessert that needs a lemony flavour. Another of the local herbs and spices which is beginning to really become a lot more popular amongst average Australians.


Mountain pepper - also beginning to spring up in a lot of average homes and average foodstuffs. Has a hot chilli/pepper sort of taste and an unique flavour and aroma. The fruits are either dried or pickled and the leaves can be dried and ground up to flavour things like sauces, chutney, meats, cheases, bread, pasta etc and is a popular addition to a nice big piece of barbecued beef.

Emu fillet - again emu is beginning to be more commonly seen in Australian homes and is popular on some restaurant menus. It is also very low in fat, cholesterol and calories and therefore needs quick cooking or basting very regularly or it tends to dry out. Lovely meaty flavour a bit like mixing chicken, beef and venison.

Water buffalo mozzarella - water buffalo were not native to Australia but were brought into the country when the Top End was opened up. The water buffalo caused a lot of damage to the wetland environment and during the B-Tek eradication campaign up North, the entire population was eradicated. A couple of farmers in the southern states had a small herd which they kept sort of 'hidden away'. Since then the farmed population has grown up again and the product of meat and cheeses are once again available (although there was always a secret stash of water buffalo meat available during the B-Tek campaign). All that aside, water buffalo is farmed and eaten all around the world as is a number of cheeses. Water buffalo mozzarella is soft and creamy with a slightly nutty taste. I would not call this an 'Australian' native food.

Wagyu beef - not really an 'Australian' foodstuff. This is a variety of beef which develop a lot more fat in the meat and this intense marbling gives a meat with high fat content and some say, a better flavour.

Barramundi - a lovely flavoured fish which some claim as the best eating fish in the world. There have been a lot of difficulties locally with most of the fish being marketed as barramundi being cheaper and easier to get fish. The flesh is very tasty and is firm, white, fine-grained meat.

Paperbark - used to prevent meat juices from escaping, gives a lightly smoky flavour.

Basically, the recipes being presented at your restaurant are using some of the traditional Aboriginal foods in a modern and upmarket recipe.

If you want more information about Australian foods, check out the Herbies site and Vic Cherikoff's site. Or key in a few of the ingredients on your menu and see a whole range of products.

The 'Australian' native foods, herbs and spices need a lot more marketting, research, publicity and acceptance. They are just as good and just as acceptable as the produce from any other country. Its just that early Australians were mainly of British stock and cooked the way they had cooked in the 'old country'. Its interesting to note that, surrounded by ample wildlife and edible plants and fruit, the early settlement at Sydney very nearly starved to death and were only saved when a supply ship arrived from England in the nick of time.

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Hiroki



Joined: 29 May 2005
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Location: Melbourne

PostPosted: Sun 02 Dec, 2007 4:50 pm    Post subject: Re: Reef N Beef Reply with quote

I'd stick to the Baramundi.
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Miruwin



Joined: 25 Dec 2001
Posts: 2108

PostPosted: Sun 02 Dec, 2007 6:50 pm    Post subject: Re: Reef N Beef Reply with quote

I'd be hard pressed to choose between the crocodile and the barramundi. I'd probably go for the crocodile although I have serious doubts about the bush tomato/hollandaise sauce mix.

The sauce I normally make for it is tamarind (prefer the whole bottled fruit to the paste), a little Ketjap Manis (Indonesian sweet soy sauce) some grated fresh ginger, chopped garlic, coriander, and a dash of sweet chili sauce. Serve on top of the battered croc tail and sprinkle shallot rings over the top.

Tamarind is a superb addition to any seafood and also goes well with chicken or pork. Its hard to describe but I reckon it tastes like the ocean.

During the early days, before Australia was colonised by the British, Maccasan seafarers used to come to the Top End for fishing and hunting. Wherever they set up their camps (normally for 4-6 months) they would plant a tamarind tree and use the fruit in their cooking. Tamarind is not a native Australian plant.

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Custardtart TP



Joined: 14 Jun 2002
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PostPosted: Wed 05 Dec, 2007 8:48 am    Post subject: Re: Reef N Beef Reply with quote

It sounds like a fascinating menu, but as with all restaurants, the dish will rely on the expertise of the chef in the kitchen on the night. That said, here's my two cents...

A good fillet of kangaroo is spectacular, the flavour is really like nothing else, it's gamey and complements a good savoury sauce. Personally, I love it with bush tomato chutney. Unfortunately, as mentioned above, if wrongly cooked it can be very tough - but then, you can ruin a good steak too!

I've only had crocodile in sausages, never had it in fillets. Was tasty, but hard to tell through all the herbs what the true flavour was like.

Any pavlova is good pavlova!!!!!! Yum.

The smoked salmon sounds awesome, I'd love to try that dish! Sounds rich, though.

Water buffalo mozzarella is pretty tasteless, it's like bocconcini, totally relies on the other elements in the recipe to give it flavour, it's only there for texture Smile Never had emu, so don't know how the balance of flavours would work out.

If you're not feeling overly adventurous, go with the wagyu beef or barramundi, I don't see how you can miss with either of these, assuming you have a good source - they are both totally delicious.

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Mazia



Joined: 16 Jun 2001
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PostPosted: Wed 05 Dec, 2007 9:21 am    Post subject: Re: Reef N Beef Reply with quote

I remember on a holiday having an Australian evening at the island resort I was at. They did a number of dishes. Native to the island was a green ant which injected pure vitamin C when it bit which was a little unusual. They used these to season a glazed salmon.

Witchitie (however its spelt) grubs are unusual and I found more tasty when you BBQ them.

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Miruwin



Joined: 25 Dec 2001
Posts: 2108

PostPosted: Wed 05 Dec, 2007 10:27 am    Post subject: Re: Reef N Beef Reply with quote

Green ants are interesting - if you grab a couple and bite off the rear end (its the large green abdomen sort of thing) its a tasty, sweet acidy flavour). The Aboriginals call them 'little angry men' as they will attack anything to protect their nest. Its not uncommon to be walking through the bush up in the Top End and bump into one of their nests (living leaves woven together at around head and shoulder level - lol) and find yourself covered in hundreds of these little biting monsters. http://home.iprimus.com.au/readman/ant.htm
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thespicepeople46



Joined: 06 Oct 2017
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PostPosted: Fri 06 Oct, 2017 1:32 pm    Post subject: Re: Reef N Beef Reply with quote

Vexo wrote:
I'm going to the capital with parents, sister and gf for my 25th birthday next friday. We're going dinning at a place called Reef N Beef, which is supposed to be Aussie "fine cuisine".

http://www.reefnbeef.dk/

So I'm wondering... do you know if any of this is good/recommendable?

Thin slices of kangaroo loin, marinated with extra virgin olive oil, lemon pepper, chopped coriander, baby capers, shaved parmesan

Crocodile tail filet served with akudjura hollandaise blue & white potatoes.

Rolled bunya nuts pavlova with sugarbark and rosella sauce.

Maple syrup & gum leaf scented smoked salmon, wattle blinis and sea parsley dressing, lemon aspen and dill cream cheese.

Kangaroo loin served medium rare served on pan fried artichoke & sweet potatoes in extra virgin olive oil, wild Tasmanian mountain pepper sauce.

Emu filet served with warm antipasto, water buffalo mozzarella, rocket and basil pesto.

Australian certified Wagyu beef steak served with charlotte and garlic mash, shitake and enoki mushrooms, lime and chipotle chili sauce.

Baked filet of Baramundi, a typically Australian salt water fish wrapped in paperbark, garnished with exotic fruits, blue potatoes, garlic/bacon sauce.


all seems interesting .. Very Happy

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Fnyanna



Joined: 28 Mar 2013
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PostPosted: Sat 07 Oct, 2017 9:34 pm    Post subject: Re: Reef N Beef Reply with quote

Talk about necro?
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